Concerned About Your Teen’s Mental Health? Here’s What You Should Know…

We held an open forum for parents on teen mental health on March 13, 2018. At the forum, parents and community members came together to talk about teen mental health, as well as receive a presentation on the subject given by Jessica York from MU’s Sinclair School of Nursing. The presentation about mental health covered 10 questions that parents often have about teen mental health, as well as answers to those questions. A few of the key topics covered in the presentation include prevention strategies, the warning signs, and ways to intervene as well as resources that could help. You can review that presentation here.

If you have current questions or concerns, you can find help at the Family Access Center of Excellence of Boone County.  Known as FACE, this center provides a means for teens 19 and under, and their families, to gain access to a wide range of assistance, sometimes for free. We encourage all of those who are interested, or who know of someone who might be interested, to go check them out, as they have a wide range of resources that can be quite useful. You can access their main website here.

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Today! Forum On Teen Mental Health

Concerned about your teen?  Want to make help them manage stress and anxiety?  Concerned about their peers? Come to our parent friendly forum TODAY and ask your questions and find answers.

WHEN:  5:30 to 6:45 pm March 13, 2018

WHERE Family Impact Center, 105 E. Ash St, Second Floor

School board candidates will be at the opening reception (5:30 to 5:45 pm).

Teresa Maledy, Tyler Lero, and Christine King have also submitted answers to our questions and you can read their responses by clicking on their names.

Teen Mental Health: What Parents Need to Know

We  will be holding a forum for parents on teen mental health, next Tuesday, March 13, 5:30 pm at the Family Impact Center, 105 E. Ash, 2nd Floor.  We will start with a short reception for hosts and board candidates from 5:30 to 5:45 pm, our program will run from 5:45 to 6:15 pm and then there will be an opportunity for questions and discussion. We hope to see you there!

Candidates, Bullying, And More! Join Us March 16.

You can join us March 16 at 6:15 for our annual parent friendly school board candidate forum. What makes our forum parent friendly?  You get to ask your own questions, actually talk to the candidates, and both food and childcare are available. Can’t stay for the entire forum or need to arrive late?  Not a problem!  With our format it is easy to come and go. We understand the difficulties you have juggling your family schedule and will welcome you for the time you have to share.  So please come!  Forum will last approximately an hour. As last year, the forum will be held at United Community Builders, 617 North Providence.  Our forum is co-sponsored with the CMSTA.

You can actually join us BEFORE the forum for  a workshop on the new bullying law and related district policy. That begins at 5:30 pm. As a parent you need to know how the changes could affect your child, and what to do if your child is bullied or accused of bullying. You can find many good resources related to bullying here.

If you are a parent or other community member concerned about maintaining and strengthening our public school system so that ALL kids have a fair opportunity to succeed we welcome you to come meet us, share your concerns, and join in our work!

5:30 pm Workshop – What Parents Need To Know About Bullying

6:15 pm School Board Candidate Forum

March 16, 2017,  617 N. Providence

 

Bullying and The Presidential Election

As you prepare your kids for school, be aware that what they may be watching on t.v. or on the internet about our national politics may not be teaching the lessons we would have them learn.  Review this report from the Southern Policy Law Center about the “Trump effect” and what it means for bullying.  Whatever your political leanings, talk to your kids about how to treat others and what to do when meeting a bully.

More Questions Than Answers

Two weeks ago CPPS facilitated the community dialogue at following the film “Once Upon A Time, When Childcare for All Wasn’t Just A Fairy Tale, sponsored by the Cradle to Career Alliance.  The film centered around President Nixon’s veto of the Comprehensive Child Development Act in 1971, and how the bipartisan support for childcare evaporated as partisanship over “family values” rose to the fore.  It also highlighted the high quality childcare programs we currently provide for military families and asked how other families might benefit by access to such programs.

Many in attendance we unaware of this  history, and were surprised by other facts shared, including that dog kennels are in some places more regulated than child care, and that day care workers can in other places earn less that parking lot attendants.  You can download a discussion guide and transcript of the film here.

As one politician stated in the film, “fear in politics often trumps hope”.  Audience members observed that when this occurs, we often lose touch with what the research says, fall into “us v. them” thinking, and fail to work together to find the solutions that could help us move forward together in ways that could benefit us all.

Audience members also discussed what quality child-centered care can look like, referring to our school district’s Title 1 preschool programs, and asked why we as the “richest country in the world” can invest in banks, the auto industry, and other commercial venues, but dismiss similar investments for families and kids as unaffordable, even as the research demonstrates that the returns on such investments are significant (one participants cited a statistic of 700% in returns for each dollar invested in early childcare) and sustainable. One participant wrote:

Our way of life is reliant on government, like it or not; some provision needs to be made.

Others observed that change never happens overnight, — that it is incremental change that drives larger change –, that even when change occurs little progress is often made in equity for minority communities, and that for the political system to work for good, that good needs to intersect with more opportunistic benefits for one or more interest groups. Participants also expressed hope that as more families are in need of quality care, and more of our children fall into poverty, the political will to invest in quality daycare, particularly for our kids in greatest need, may build.

One point noted in the film, which was echoed in the audience discussion, was that how we talk about an issue has a significant effect on the way we work together and what we as a community are willing to support. The Raising of America website contains tips and an excellent “action toolkit” that you can download.  These resources will help you think about what words to use if you want to encourage greater investment in our kids, and to address the arguments that have prevented that investment in the past.